Ten Talents Farm: Colorado Mountain Dogs
 
 
Ten Talents Farm
Colorado Mountain Dogs
​"Great Pyrenees Hybrids"
 

  
Ten Talents Farm is dedicated to breeding & training the best Colorado Mountain Dogs available that will love & guard both family & livestock whether on the farm or hiking trails. Our family-run business operates several different businesses from our 40-acre farm in Black Forest. Colorado Mountain Dogs are our main focus, but we also raise Katadin sheep, chickens, and goats. Each of us also works in one or more of the following family businesses: Support for Learning Disabled, Wedding Cakes & Floral, Wedding Photography/Videography Services, Graphic Design, Welding, and even Jewelry Design & Production.
  

HISTORY OF COLORADO MOUNTAIN DOGS

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Colorado Mountain
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Livestock Guardian
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Livestock Guardian
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Great Pyrenees puppies for sale
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Great Pyrenees puppies for sale
Great Pyrenees puppies for sale
Great Pyrenees puppies for sale
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Great Pyranees puppies for sale
Great Pyranees puppies for sale
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Great Pyranees puppies for sale
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The Colorado Mountain Dog (CMD) is the vision of Wendy Francisco. Living in the foothills of Northern Colorado, she has to deal with a lot of native wildlife, including mountain lions, so she wanted a big protective dog. She found one in Caspian, a very large, beautiful 75% Great Pyrenees, 25% Anatolian Shepherd mix. He is such a great dog that Wendy decided to breed him and acquired Snow, a Great Pyrenees female mixed with Hungarian Kuvasz. Although smaller than Caspian, Snow is a wonderful guardian with a gentle, quiet nature. Their pups grew into strikingly beautiful dogs with wonderful dispositions that were great family dogs as well as great guardians. (Purebred Great Pyrenees tend to be very independent and generally less responsive to humans, so she knew she was on to something!) Knowing there was a real need for Livestock Guardian Dogs (LGDs) who could also be great family pets, Wendy started the Colorado Mountain Dog (CMD) program.
 
This decision urged Wendy to bring in help with the program so in the summer of 2010, she enlisted Amy Cabrera and me. Snow and Aravis (Snow and Caspian’s daughter) were given to Amy, and Tirian (Great Pyrenees with some Anatolian Shepherd out of Ohio, and the second stud to be introduced into the program) was given to me. Titian sired several litters in the following couple years. Tirian loved everyone and was a fantastic guard dog (he actually carried a newborn goat in his mouth across our field and under two fences up to our porch one icy morning to alert me to the birth!) Sadly, Tirian was neutered by a well-meaning shelter when he ran off with Arwen, our female in heat (I’ve since found out that this in common mating behavior). Arwen, another daughter of Caspian but out of "River", came into the program in 2011 when I acquired her from a Girl Scout Ranch in northern Colorado. Her personality was not quite as laid back as her sister Aravis – Arwen was very sensitive, loyal, and protective which made her a great guardian but also more aloof and not as friendly as we like to see in our Colorado Mountain Dogs.  She was only used for a few litters, in large part because after Titian was neutered in the fall of 2012, she wouldn’t have much to do with another male.  Several great pups came from her including Titan, one of the studs in the Colorado Mountain Dog program who is owned by the Pfaltsgrafs in Canon City.
 
So, our dogs are not purebred Great Pyrenees but are often confused for them though they tend to have a little less stocky build. We first look for great temperament and guarding instincts from the parents before acquiring a pup, then raise the pup to two years before making the decision whether or not to accept him or her into the program.  I personally have acquired, raised, trained, and then rehomed several young males/females because they didn’t measure up to my standards. A slightly different example is Regidor, a purebred Maremma that I brought in from Michigan. The Maremma is known to be highly intelligent and I hoped he would be able to replace Tirian as my stud, while bringing in much needed new blood to increase the genetic pool and overall health of our dogs. While he did produce some awesome pups, he also produced pups with very high energy since the Maremma is in the “working class” of dogs rather than “guardian class.”  This meant the pups needed a lot of attention while young to keep them out of mischief and a definite purpose to their lives, but if you wanted to take them cross country skiing with the family, they were certainly up to it! I still have Reg because I really love this dog, but I retired him from the program in 2013 since I wanted a slightly mellower dog. Two of his daughters are still in the program, but that means their pups are only one quarter Maremma which we’re found works well.
 
Other characteristics we look for are a manageable coat (I brush my dogs once or twice a year) and a pure white color (though some of our breeders are expanding on the color). I personally want a “dry mouth” which means no drooling. People really want to “genotype” the Colorado Mountain Dog, so I tell them the Colorado Mountain Dog is largely based on the Great Pyrenees. That in itself it not really a good answer though since as I’ve already mentioned, a full blood Pyrenees is often very independent and not really a good family dog. We look at personality and “phenotype” (what the dog looks like), and we search across the country to find the standards we want in our dogs. Our goal is to eventually get the Colorado Mountain Dog recognized by the AKC, but first we have to get enough blood lines into the program to make standardized breeding possible. I have since added other males and females that you can read about on my “Meet my Dogs” page.
 
Besides just breeding these wonderful dogs, I am also studying to become a professional trainer/behaviorist. This came about through multiple conversations with buyers who needed a little extra help coaching their dogs. Though most of our dogs guard instinctively, sometimes wandering or barking become problems as they try to protect the entire neighborhood! Yes, both of these traits are common to the breed: The wandering can be overcome by establishing strong boundaries for your pup when young, and the barking, well that’s part of their nature to protect their territory. Some really like to bark while some are much quieter. This too can be corrected – just let them know what’s okay to bark at and what’s not. It takes effort, but a well-trained livestock guardian dog is worth it! If you have questions/problems, feel free to call me or my son Paul (also becoming a trainer) and talk a while.
 
  
CALL US NOW!
(719) 244-4468
We'll be happy to answer any questions.
CONTACT INFO
 
9845 Walker Road
Black Forest, CO  80908
 
CMD WEBSITES:
Colorado Mountain Dogs